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Using Computer and Digital Humanities (DH) Technologies To Teach Creative Thinking In Primary And Secondary Schools

By Augustine Farinola

Abstract

Philosophy for Children (P4C), as an approach developed by Professor Matthew Lipman in 1970, has helped in making young people to participate in group dialogues focused on philosophical issues through the use of visual Digital Humanities (DH) technological tools such as Videos, Images, Visual Reality, and other Computer devices. Meanwhile, this paper argues that the importation of such technologies to Africa towards teaching Philosophy at pre-tertiary level would not be productive unless there is an inclusion of African ontological and epistemological framework.  Thus, the aim of this paper is to instantiate such approach by giving an analysis of how pictorial and animated depiction of African Proverbs, Folklores, Tales, and Stories have generated deep philosophical thoughts and has stimulated dialogues among young Africans and encourage them to ask questions, construct arguments, and engage in reasoned discussion. This research uses Netnography and Qualitative Research Method. Our data were extracted various online platforms such as “African Proverbs: @africanproverbspage”, “Akili and Me” Preschoolers Cartoons by Ubongo Media, Kwame Animations, Paul Ankomah’s Animation of Ananse Stories, Rashidat Hassan’s Animation of African Tales, Abdul Ndadi’s Orisha’s Journey, Mark of Uru’s Animation, and the collection of animated cartoons initiated by UNESCO Dakar and ADEA. We also analyse the Folkloric Philosophical works of Marie Pauline Eboh and Matthew Lipman’s works on method of teaching Philosophy to Children (P4C). Using the template developed, the paper concludes that the use of DH technologies with African contents and in view of African context enhance critical thinking skills in African children.

Keywords: P4C (Philosophy for Children), Digital Humanities, Technological Tools, Ontology, Epistemology,


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